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Women's History

This library research guide provides an introduction to library resources related to Women's History Month and women's history courses.

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2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment

Penn[sylvania] on the picket line-- 1917

Penn[sylvania] on the picket line-- 1917
Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman's Party, 1875-1938

 

' Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.” Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as “Women’s History Week.” In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as "Women’s History Month". '

For more information, go to https://www.womenshistorymonth.gov/

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Amendment 19: Women's Right to Vote

Cambridge Education, 2009. Films on Demand.

Women's Letters: America From the Revolutionary War to the Present

Historical events of the last three centuries come alive through these women’s singular correspondences—often their only form of public expression. In 1775, Rachel Revere tries to send financial aid to her husband, Paul, in a note that is confiscated by the British; First Lady Dolley Madison tells her sister about rescuing George Washington’s portrait during the War of 1812; one week after JFK’s assassination, Jacqueline Kennedy pens a heartfelt letter to Nikita Khrushchev; and on September 12, 2001, a schoolgirl writes a note of thanks to a New York City firefighter, asking him, “Were you afraid?” The letters gathered here also offer fresh insight into the personal milestones in women’s lives. Here is a mid-nineteenth-century missionary describing a mastectomy performed without anesthesia; Marilyn Monroe asking her doctor to spare her ovaries in a handwritten note she taped to her stomach before appendix surgery; an eighteen-year-old telling her mother about her decision to have an abortion the year after Roe v. Wade; and a woman writing to her parents and in-laws about adopting a Chinese baby. With more than 400 letters and over 100 stunning photographs, Women’s Letters is a work of astonishing breadth and scope, and a remarkable testament to the women who lived–and made–history. From the Hardcover edition.

Handbook of American Women's History

This exceptional reference presents short articles on key people, events, and ideas that have shaped the history of women in the United States. Thoroughly revised and updated, the second edition features more than 100 new entries as well as, for the first time, photographs and artwork illustrating key concepts. Aimed at librarians, students, and teachers, the Handbook of American Women's History provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary view of a fascinating field of study. Arranged alphabetically, each entry is accompanied by a bibliography of primary and secondary sources to which interested readers can turn for more information. Editors Angela M. Howard and Frances M. Kavenik also provide an extensive subject/name index and end-of-entry cross-referencing to make the book an invaluable resource.

Women's History Courses at SC4

Citation

Image: Penn[sylvania] on the picket line-- 1917 Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman's Party, 1875-1938. https://www.loc.gov/resource/mnwp.160022

Text: "March is Women's History Month." Women's History Month.gov, Library of Congress, 2017, womenshistorymonth.gov/about/.